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." >> a second explosion at the damaged fukushima at -- power plant and 11 people are injuried. japan offers assurances that risks remain low. tens of thousands of people are still missing amidst the race of trying to find loved ones. >> hello and welcome. also in this program, japan's stocks tumble. they take emergency action by pouring in cash to the market. >> japan's nuclear crisis appears to be deepening. in the last few hours, there has been a second explosion at the fukushima nuclear plant. speaking in the last hour, japan's cabinet secretary said the risk of today's explosion caused an uncontrolable leak of radiation is low. but the u.s. said it had moved away from the area after one of its aircraft carriers detected low-level radiation 160 kilometers off shore. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from the area. let's go to my correspondent who is in japan in the sendai area with all the very latest. >> hello to you. you join me on the outskirts of sendai city. this main wall behind me is where the wall of tsunami, sea water, washed up about a half a mile from the harbor
at a nuclear plant in the earthquake-devastated region of japan. the japanese government is confirming a radiation leak has happened. and they are fighting against a nuclear meltdown. we have a live report for you from tokyo ahead. >> the massive earthquake triggering a ripple effect across the pacific hitting hawaii and governor brown if california call for a state of emergency along the northern coast including in santa cruz. >> in japan, the third largest producer of nuclear power and how trouble at the nuclear reactor could devastate global markets. friend friend hour two begins right now. >> good morning, everyone, thank you for joining us. and now you need to say glued to the show for three hours because there is so much breaking news including what is going on in japan. they are racing to prevent a meltdown after an explosion at the largest nuclear plant. the nation is getting a look at the destruction. you can see the images. >> these are new images as crews are getting out to assess the damage. adam housley is on the ground in tokyo assessing what is going on. tokyo is the sta
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
." >> a new aftershock shakes japan as two workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are treated for high levels of radiation. the battle for libya goes on. france says it could take weeks, not months, to destroy gaddafi's military capabilities. parliament rejects austerity measures in portugal and the prime minister resigns. welcome to "bbc world news." i am david eades. also coming up in the program, the suicide bombing ritual acted out by children and posted as an online video. >> two workers at japan's fukushima nuclear power station have been taken to the hospital after they were exposed to high levels of radiation. the leak of radiation has already contaminated tokyo's water supply. authorities say that tap water is once again safe. in the last couple of hours, there's been a further strong aftershock. at a news conference just a short while ago, the japanese chief cabinet secretary was talking about what had happened to those two nuclear workers. >> yesterday at reactor building number three, workers were laying cables. the radiation levels have been monitored constantly. they stepped int
: "fox and friends" starts right now. >> martha: the last on the story out of japan. workers in the failed nuclear physicists riactor site are getting set to go back to work. one report said the workers niver left that site and then reports that they evacuated 50 corgous people who were staying there to try to cool the nuclear physicists reactors . we have had conflicting reports. >> brian: four of those men are missing. they were working on one of the reactors. we'll follow up on that. >> martha: unbelievable story . new pictures show at least two of the plant's reactors are completely destroyed . we have seen the araeil shots . trying to figure out what to do next to prevent a complete meltdown there. >> brian: when tempco was fulling -- pulling out the prime minister demanded what was going on and demanded they go back. >> steve: we'll go to ykoto air force base. david piper is standing by. >>reporter: the new crisis piraling oust control. in a desperate move japanese military helicopter was sent up with a huge bucket of water to dump it on the fukushima plant. they had to
. >> japan is to de commission four of the reactors. tokyo electric power made the announcement three weeks after failing to bring reactors one to four under control. harmful levels of radiation have been detected in the area. the bbc's mark worthington told me owe -- how worrying these radiation levels are. >> they are the most concerning we've had outside the reactors. much higher than anything seen in the vea water until now. suggesting the radioactive material is somehow leaking out. an indication that there's a dispersal 16 kilometers to the south they have been much lower, but elevated levels all adding to the growing concern that this might have some kind of impact on japan's crucial fishery. >> so this is far from being under control. >> yes. and tepco has used almost that phrase saying they cannot say reactors one to four are at this stage under control. they are stabilizing slowly, they say, but because it's such a difficult task and because it's gone on so long and because they believe there's been a part of meltdown and because if you've seen the true scale of destruction, they
." >> more troubles for japan's stricken nuclear plant as two are taken to the hospital for nuclear expose your of radiation. and it could take weeks to destroy gaddafi's military. welcome to "bbc world news." i'm david eades. also coming up in the program. a call to martyrdom, a video showing pakistani children acting out a suicide bombing. >> hello. two workers at japan's power plant have been taken to the hospital after being exposed to high levels of radiation. the radiation has already gotten into the water supply although japanese authorities say it's now safe for babies. there's a news conference the japanese cabinet member describes what has happened to the workers. >> yesterday at reactor building number three, workers were laying cables. radiation levels is being monitored constantly by their individual sim tris, but the water contained higher levels of radiation. as a result, the workers were exposed to the radiation of more than 170 middle veertveerts. they have been transfered to hospitals to seek necessary treatment. >> well, aid is beginning to get through to some on the nor
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
>>> good morning. breaking news. a surge in radiation levels at the crippled nuclear plant in japan forces emergency crews to evacuate overnight. while they are now getting back to work, there are new fears that those 50 heroic workers could be running out of options today, wednesday, march 16, 2011. r captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. meredith is on assignment. you just think about the pressure those workers must be under, the sacrifice they may be making. they are being dubbed the fukushima 50, one of the last lines of defense against an all-out meltdown. >> imagine the concern when they were temporarily pulled from the plant overnight after radiation levels spiked for a short term. another concern, the second fire reactor number four today, where spent fuel rods are being stored. >> in a rare appearance, japan's emperor delivered a televised address saying he was, quote, deeply worried, but urged people not to give up hope. we are going to have
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
-moon on the earthquake and tsunami in japan. he said they will do everything to help japan. we'll have that live on c-span2. in the meantime, anita in "washington journals" he's the ranking member on the subcommittee that covers foreign operations. >> host: thanks for being here. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: wow, we have a lot going on today. i'm going to start with libya just because the secretary was talking about it. again leaders why europe are meeting, france is pushing for a no-fly zone. what are your thoughts about the u.s. involvement level? how big should it be? and why is that a good investment for this country? >> guest: it's clear to me after discussing it in depth with secretary clinton is the administration is actively involved in strategy sessions and discussions with the international community. the united states cannot act independently. and people may say no-fly zone, they may say -- they may come up with all kinds of actions, but number one, there are implication implications as secretary gates said to every one the proposals. unless we act with the international community, i do
you would get on an intercontinental flight, going here from europe, say, or here from japan. i'm going to japan next week and i will get more radiation on my flight to japan next week than you will get from drinking any of this milk that they're seeing now. >> wow that is interesting. the epa stepping up monitoring. certainly want to watch these radiation levels. is there a way that we can know for sure, really, that it's safe? even though it's nice to than they're watching it, but -- >> well, the epa has got very good systems for looking at this, and we're getting ahead of the curve here. where we ran into problems at chernobyl where i was working years ago, was they didn't get monitoring fast enough. they didn't get ahead of the curve. we're way ahead of the curve on this. the epa has the ability to do this, we're going to be able to prevent anything from happening here in the united states and in the near term. >> i wanted to talk more with you about this. i know that a lot of people have questions about this and i do as well. only halfway through my list for you, cham. we'l
in the east. faced by devastation, japan faces all long-term crisis with thousands without shelter in the cold. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- a call to martyrdom. the online video showing pakastani children acting out a suicide bombing. and it looks like true love, but is it? why sham marriages are on the rise in britain. hello to you. the syrian president tries to calm his country. he has ordered the release of everyone detained in the current unrest. he has also promised to lift wages and possibly emergency rules in place for 50 years. it is reported thousands attended the funerals of people killed when security forces fired on anti-government protesters wednesday. >> shocking scenes on the streets, the troubled southern city at the center of the unrest. shot down by gunmen. the bbc cannot independently verify the image is posted on social network sites. but security forces were blamed for the killings. this protesters as -- stay on the ground. do not move. no one is lifting a
meltdown is confirmed at the fukushima plant in japan. welcome to "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy. also in this program -- anna chapman, the woman accused of spying, says she will never confirm she was a russian agent. and can a star of the "harry potter" films cast its spell over broadway? >> there are conflicting reports about whether colonel good after eye's hometown of sirte has fallen into rebel hands. the city was targeted by international air strikes overnight, and the rebels are now claiming victory. but the government denies the city has been taken. some reports from international journalists say the main buildings in the town center are still in government hands. there's no sign of any rebels. in the last few days, a number of communities and important oil installations, including a breaker, have fallen to rebels since they took control. sirte is halfway between the costa long tripoli and benghazi. let's go live to ben brown. >> yeah, we're on the coastal highway that ultimately is a few hours' drive down the road behind me. yesterday, the anti-gaddafi rebels took
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
this month. usa today has a story about the situation in japan growing and have an impact here in the united states. we will talk about exports and imports and how this plays into japan later on in the program. before our last phone call, i want to show you what colonel gaddafi had to say late yesterday evening about the situation in libya. >> all the muslim armies have to take part in this battle against the crusaders. their protest all over the world to help you come in asia, and africa, in america, in europe. they are people against their own leaders. we will been -- we will win, we will be victorious, we will not surrender. host: an independent in north carolina, your the last phone call. what do you think? caller: thank god for c-span and. i am from south carolina, and only heard it once, our leaders met behind closed doors, which is illegal. i keep hearing about going to cut, going to cut. i walked into my nearby pharmacy and they didn't know and i did not know that my medicaid had been cut. and they were not -- i'm a diabetic with kidney failure, but i could not get my insulin pills o
security council. and to add additional at-on sanctions from our partners, including the e.u., japan, and others. when you are trying to sanction iran, no matter how powerful you are and how much we can do, it is imperative that we get the international community to support it. otherwise, there is too much leakage. we have limited that, and i feel strongly that we are making an impact. >> thank you, and i request written responses that you offered to the questions that you are not able to answer because i have so many, including the deposition of the libyan officials, which is so timely. my good friend, the ranking member. >> i want to commend my colleagues on the committee the speech that secretary clinton gave in addition to her estimate -- excellent testimony, but yesterday, going to the human rights council, where she discussed libya, iran, and other issues come up quite a remarkable presentation, particularly in pointing out ypocrisy of ouriran's condemnations of libya. i would like asked -- try to get into issues in this short time. one, the israeli-palestinian process. the que
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
friend and ally japan. i spoke with members of the foreign affairs and ministry of justice regarding the fact that japan has become a destination country, a haven for international child abductions. our foreign service officers and consul general were extremely sympathetic. at least 171 children and 131 broken hearted parents are worried sick and have no access to see their children. all of us want japan to sign the hague convention on international child deduction. that treaty will not solve the current cases. they stand at great risk of being left behind a second time. what is the administration's plan to resolve the current cases? on at least five occasions, president obama has met with them. did he raise the issue of those children and their left behind parents? since 1979, brothers and sisters have been illegal in china as part of the bar. one child per couple policy. for over 30 years, the you and public relations -- the u.n. population fund has supported and celebrated the mass of crimes against humanity. the facts are uncontested. any chinese or to that woman without -- or ti
is and the melting nuclear melting in japan shows how perilous our dependence on nuclear power is and they underscore our failure to have a broad based energy portfolio and our failure to have a rational look at our energy usage. mr. russo, - to set prices are determined by supply and demand globally, and several of you have said that sort of thing. let me ask i guess the first mr. newell, what is the scale and let's put it in perspective here of possible short term energy production. i mean, suppose there were a lot more leases for offshore drilling released in the last couple of years to hear the curious oppose or even a in the drilling on private land. what is the scale of the increase in production we might achieve compared to what opec can do by turning defaults up and down in the short term? >> welcome there is a considerable lag in the increased access resources and an expiration and the element and the ultimate protection of the resources so there's an important issue would return to the time scale which i think you mentioned in the short run to respond to the immediate impact send crude oil
afghanistan by the end of the year. follow the house live, here on c-span. >> earlier today, japan's prime minister called the damage from the earthquake the most severe challenge the nation has faced since world war ii. friday's disasters damage a series of nuclear reactors, particularly -- potentially sending one to a personal -- a partial meltdown. this statement is about 10 minutes. >> i would like to express my deepest sympathy to those who have been affected by the quake, and also in the disaster stricken areas, as well as to the people of japan who are in a very difficult situation. people remain very calm, and i would like to express my deepest gratitude as well as my respect to all those who are behaving very calmly. boeing yesterday, today we worked very hard to rescue people, and so far, the self- defense force as well as police and firefighters and maritime are able to save about 12,000 people. i would like to explain about the rescue efforts. the self-defense forces, all of the forces have mobilized 50,000 people, and they are to be doubled to 100,000, and the police officers,
to take resources away from that to help the effort to analyze what happened in japan the decisions on the new reactors are still some time away. right now they're getting public comment. that will take a few months to get all of those comments in. then we will begin the process of reviewing them. that is still several months away. i am not sure exactly how we will balance our resources. mother nature has thrown a hideous tons of the japanese, bigger than their civil a nuclear engineers and licensing authority's anticipated. how can we be confident -- not that we are likely to say tsunami -- how can we be confident that we won't have a hurricane, earthquake and other natural phenomenon that is bigger than the biggest thing you have budgeted for it? guest: the way we think about it is we come up with what we think is the maximum natural phenomenon that we expect to occur and we designed these facilities around that with a little bit extra margin because we now there are some things we don't know. we recognize there may things we had not envisioned or thought about. we have establishe
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
places like helmand province, baghdad, those in japan helping the people recover from >> at a town hall meeting earlier today, president obama said that u.s. involvement in libya would be limited in both time and scope. the president will speak to the nation about libya and washington d.c. later today. we will have that live at 7:30 eastern and take your calls. the senate is back from their spring recess this afternoon. members gavel then to talk about a technology bill. more on that tomorrow on the legislation. also, a u.s. district court judicial nomination a vote on the nomination is expected shortly in the senate. in the house returns tomorrow for legislative and business a bill that would temporarily extend the airport programs. the federal aviation commission programs bill. >> tonight, perspectives on the deal between at&t and t-mobile. and from the communications workers of america and consumers union's discuss the impact on the wireless industry, what the deal faces in the justice department and the potential impact on consumers. >> on saturday, the former u.s. ambassador t
.n. world food program has delivered so far $2 million worth of aid to japan, but the agency said today that japan still needs much more temporary shelter. sanitation help and health equipment. finally, another member of the britain house of commons has been sentenced to prison for making fraudulent expense -- fraudulent expense claims. jim divine has been sent to prison for filing bogus invoices for cleaning and printing work, totaling more than $13,000. a total of three to 92 current and former british legislators have been ordered to pay a total of 1.1 million pounds and expenses. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is open quote washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house. weeknights coming congressional hearings and policy forums. also, supreme court oral arguments. on the weekend, see our signature programs. on saturday, "the communicator's." on sunday, "newsmakers." you can also watch our program at c-span.org, and it is searchable in our c-span video li
deemployed in japan. it did very well. the team over was were not affected by the recent events in japan. we're thankful for that. it is connected to the c2bmc in hawaii, and as said before, our ship, especially our surveillance capability in the sea of japan is shown here. this is our initial capability. it shows one layer of defense in the three charts i've just shown. next chart. when we moved to 2015, our aim is to go from an initial capability to a robust capability. again, how do you define "robust?" there's not a clear definition, and i'll state what the agency adopted and in concert with the ballistic missile defense review conducted last year was one interpretation of robust, and it's ours is that when a missile's launched at you, you have opportunities to shoot it with multiple systems, independent technologies engaging that are integrated together through a center network again taking multiple views using multiple freak sighs so that -- frequencies to that is makes it very resilient capability, and by 2015 with the introduction of the sm32a, you can also see the introduction on th
so many americans dried in europe, korea, vietnam, japan, the middle east? is our government's decision to fight for freedom based on oil, money or principle? >> and jeremiah writes i think the biggest problem in the country is america thinks about the problem of other countries before our own. what will it take for the ruling powers in our own country to put the u.s. first? this nation has enough problems already we need to deal with now. if you want to read more on this, got a lot of e-mail, got to the cnn.com/caffertyfile. >> all right, jack. thank you. jack cafferty with the cafferty file. >>> a hidden camera records controversial remarks by an npr executive. the activist behind it also controversial. we'll have the story next. t wit, i get fast, 24-hour allergy relief. so i feel better by the time we tee off. zyrtec® liquid gels work fast, so i can love the air®. so i feel better by the time we tee off. somewhere in america, a city comes to life. it moves effortlessly, breathes easily. it flows with clean water. it makes its skyline greener and its population healthier
enemies or our competitors -- china, japan, and the tyrants in the middle east. there is no end in sight, and the president's own budget, he has got to in years of deficit. he will add more to the national debt in his four years than all presidents or him combine. what is washington doing? thank god for the tea party. i noticed -- [applause] thank god for paul ryan and the republican party and steve king and others. washington is not about leadership. washington is not about the people. washington is about money and reelection. had he figured it out? -- have you figured it out? i will tell you a story, the nation is hurting, and washington, d.c., is a boom town. how does that grab you? i tell you what they are addicted to. special interest money, all i want is access money, wall street money, to be to fail money. union money, the pac money, pac money back money, corporate money, a pharmaceutical money, all subsidy money, ethanol subsidy money, insurance money, tort reform money. the system is institutionally corrupt. where are the people? they're left that. i go to washington once every
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
in japan. members will hear from the head of our nuclear regulatory commission, 10:00 a.m. eastern. although later in the day, live on c-span3 8:45 eastern, congressional correspondents dinner. rand paul and anthony wiener of new york, and others. >> for more than a quarter decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant. muammar gaddafi. he is denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorize innocent people around the world. >> follow what key leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the president and other administration officials, from the house and senate floor, and other leaders around the world, all on line at the c-span video library board search, watch, click, and share any time. >> in libya tuesday, the u.s. struck a missile storage facility near tripoli will forces loyal to muammar gaddafi the drove back rebels near his home town. in london, foreign ministers and representatives of more than 40 countries met to discuss how to deal with libya. after that meeting, british foreign secreta
countries -- japan and brides.rea to importwho import those countries do not have a disparity. what does it mean? i do not know what it means, but i think we have jump to conclusions quite a bit. maybe in the end it will pan out some kind of impact. it is a moral issue, and i think that is why people are attracted to it. we wanted to be a security issue, but i think it may not be at all. >> a gentleman over here, and then we will work down to the front >t. nk you.6nank richard and i have known each other for many years. in that report, youth have become a major factor. we have looked at the current distribution of youth in the muslim majority countries, africa, europe, and the middle east. this is going to increase further to 30% in the next few years. with the exception of few countries, the rates have declined substantially. most of that country's will increase further. i would like to shift from africa to tunisia. 28% of people are youth, a tiny population compared to the region i come from, south asia. in we are about 180 million people in pakistan. that means about 60 million young
is the highest with about 38%. i think only japan is higher. it is all put this on an impact. will you comment on that? >> you are correct. our tax rate look soon to be the highest. ia good tax code would have a broad base. this speciallot deductions and extensions. by getting a broad base coming you can lower the rate. that provides greater incentives for firms to locate. do you tax based only on profits earned in the united states are blow for profit? but at what rate to you think we should aim for that would put this in the best position in terms of competition on the global stage? >> i did not have a single number in mind. there are is the number of deductio. we will certainly get it down if we can. >> part of the charges to keep prices stable. on the one hand, we have to pay down the debt. to what is this a faulted the economy? it is still volatil or week. athere is a $1 billion cut we passed around. why is the discrepancy in the figure of around 6005000 to 700? that is a huge difference. who doou believe here? we have a number of questions. we are trying to understand the reasons. >> wou
and japan. these were total wars on the conditions of total defeat. in the age of post em -- imperial empires, they do not bow down. the most extraordinary and bizarre statement ever made in contemporary was rumsfeld shock and awe. we had shock people and from that they will bow down and consent. what makes the new arab revolutions difference -- different is these were from below. with the international or national conditions. here you had the extraordinary pressure on local economies and arab economies, rising commodity prices, rising food prices, which impacted directly on the dire and stance of living. at the same time, you have a hugely young population wired together more than before with rising expectations. an educational system that works and turned out educated people and educated people driving buses. nothing wrong with driving buses, but finding the roles and occupations lower than the expectations that they have. this produces the blow. that seems to be historicically creates greater conditions for the democracy than anything that the britain or america were trying to do i
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